This article analyzes John Grisham’s The Client (1993), focusing on the role of the corpse within the text’s symbolic economy. Rather than a realistic portrait of the American juridical system, as it might appear, the novel turns out to be an updated version of the traditional ‘American dream’, by idealizing America as the land where justice, restored to its authentic and genuinely American nature, works a means of individual redemption and social affirmation.

Habeas Corpse. The Dead Body of Evidence in John Grisham’s The Client

IULIANO, FIORENZO
2014

Abstract

This article analyzes John Grisham’s The Client (1993), focusing on the role of the corpse within the text’s symbolic economy. Rather than a realistic portrait of the American juridical system, as it might appear, the novel turns out to be an updated version of the traditional ‘American dream’, by idealizing America as the land where justice, restored to its authentic and genuinely American nature, works a means of individual redemption and social affirmation.
978-1-78238-433-5
John Grisham, death studies, corpse
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/113859
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