Since their introduction in the early 1970s, microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been dominating the electrophysiology market thanks to their reliability, extreme robustness, and usability. Over the past 40 years, silicon technology has also played a role in the advancement of the field, and CMOS-based in vitro and in vivo systems are now able to achieve unprecedented spatial resolutions, giving the possibility to unveil hidden behavior of cellular aggregates down to the subcellular level. However, both the MEAs and silicon-based electronic devices present unavoidable problems such as their expensiveness, the usual rigidity of the employed materials, and the need of an (usually bulky) external reference electrode. Possible interesting alternatives to these incredibly useful devices unexpectedly lie in the field of organic electronics, thanks to the fast-growing pace of improvement that this discipline has undergone in the last 10–15 years. In this chapter, a particular organic transistor called organic charge-modulated field-effect transistor (OCMFET) will be presented as a promising bio–electronic interface, and a complete description of its employment as a detector of cellular electrical activity and as an ultrasensitive pH sensor will be provided, together with the discussion about the possibility of using such a device as an innovative multisensing tool for both electrophysiology and (neuro)pharmacology.

From MEAs to MOAs: The Next Generation of Bioelectronic Interfaces for Neuronal Cultures

Spanu A.
Primo
;
Bonfiglio A.
2019

Abstract

Since their introduction in the early 1970s, microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been dominating the electrophysiology market thanks to their reliability, extreme robustness, and usability. Over the past 40 years, silicon technology has also played a role in the advancement of the field, and CMOS-based in vitro and in vivo systems are now able to achieve unprecedented spatial resolutions, giving the possibility to unveil hidden behavior of cellular aggregates down to the subcellular level. However, both the MEAs and silicon-based electronic devices present unavoidable problems such as their expensiveness, the usual rigidity of the employed materials, and the need of an (usually bulky) external reference electrode. Possible interesting alternatives to these incredibly useful devices unexpectedly lie in the field of organic electronics, thanks to the fast-growing pace of improvement that this discipline has undergone in the last 10–15 years. In this chapter, a particular organic transistor called organic charge-modulated field-effect transistor (OCMFET) will be presented as a promising bio–electronic interface, and a complete description of its employment as a detector of cellular electrical activity and as an ultrasensitive pH sensor will be provided, together with the discussion about the possibility of using such a device as an innovative multisensing tool for both electrophysiology and (neuro)pharmacology.
978-3-030-11134-2
978-3-030-11135-9
Cell electrical activity monitoring; MEAs; OCMFETs; pH sensing; Pharmacology; Cell culture techniques; Electrophysiology; Neurons; Microelectrodes
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/294067
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