Urban freight consolidation centres (UFCCs) can provide a significant contribution to reducing the negative impacts of freight transport to city centres whilst at the same time providing a more seamless, higher-value logistics experience for their users. By collecting the goods destined to the target area and consolidating them into a single delivery made by a high load-factor vehicle, UFCCs have the potential to relieve congestion, reduce energy consumption and improve air quality. The paper draws on the experiences of the Bristol-Bath freight consolidation centre (BBFCC), established in 2002 to serve Bristol city centre and uniquely extended in 2011 to cover a second neighbouring city centre, Bath, each served by electric lorries; it appraises the benefits of shared ‘final mile’ freight services, presenting a model for the evaluation of the reduction in traffic and polluting emissions based on Bristol, with a view to optimising future UFCC design. Data about the number of deliveries made by heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) of different types to the BBFCC and the number of deliveries made from the BBFCC to the two shopping centres covering a period of 17 months are analysed. The correlation between the type and number of HGVs delivering to the BBFCC and the number of deliveries made to the retailers by the BBFCC is explicated by means of a multiple regression model. Its development is based on analysing classic progressive parameters: R Square value (total and adequate), F-statistics and t-statistics for each coefficient. An estimation of the number of HGVs re-routing to the BBFCC and the pollutant emissions avoided in the urban centre is appraised. The pollutant emissions reduction is based on factors drawn from the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. Emissions reductions in the host cities are identified as a result of sharing delivery vehicles for the final leg. The regression models developed provide a useful tool for local authorities and logistics/transport planners in optimising the planning of UFCCs to reduce freight traffic and associated emissions.

Reduced urban traffic and emissions within urban consolidation centre schemes: the case of Bristol

PADDEU, DANIELA;FADDA, PAOLO;FANCELLO, GIANFRANCO;
2014

Abstract

Urban freight consolidation centres (UFCCs) can provide a significant contribution to reducing the negative impacts of freight transport to city centres whilst at the same time providing a more seamless, higher-value logistics experience for their users. By collecting the goods destined to the target area and consolidating them into a single delivery made by a high load-factor vehicle, UFCCs have the potential to relieve congestion, reduce energy consumption and improve air quality. The paper draws on the experiences of the Bristol-Bath freight consolidation centre (BBFCC), established in 2002 to serve Bristol city centre and uniquely extended in 2011 to cover a second neighbouring city centre, Bath, each served by electric lorries; it appraises the benefits of shared ‘final mile’ freight services, presenting a model for the evaluation of the reduction in traffic and polluting emissions based on Bristol, with a view to optimising future UFCC design. Data about the number of deliveries made by heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) of different types to the BBFCC and the number of deliveries made from the BBFCC to the two shopping centres covering a period of 17 months are analysed. The correlation between the type and number of HGVs delivering to the BBFCC and the number of deliveries made to the retailers by the BBFCC is explicated by means of a multiple regression model. Its development is based on analysing classic progressive parameters: R Square value (total and adequate), F-statistics and t-statistics for each coefficient. An estimation of the number of HGVs re-routing to the BBFCC and the pollutant emissions avoided in the urban centre is appraised. The pollutant emissions reduction is based on factors drawn from the UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. Emissions reductions in the host cities are identified as a result of sharing delivery vehicles for the final leg. The regression models developed provide a useful tool for local authorities and logistics/transport planners in optimising the planning of UFCCs to reduce freight traffic and associated emissions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/86686
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