In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic sediment resuspension on quantity, biochemical composition and bioavailability of particulate organic matter (POM), two field investigations were carried out in two shallow coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In the Gulf of Lions, we investigated the impact of a storm resuspension of sediment, whereas in the Thermaikos Gulf we investigated the impact of bottom trawling. Resuspension in the Gulf of Lions determined the increase of sedimentation rates, modified the composition of the organic fraction of settling particles and decreased the labile fraction of POM, as indicated by a drop in the enzymatically hydrolysable amino acid fraction. The increase in the refractory fraction, following short-term storm-induced resuspension, increased also the contribution of glycine and decreased the contribution of aspartic acid contents to the total amino acid pools. Trawling activities in Thermaikos Gulf determined a significant increase in suspended POM concentrations and important changes in its biochemical composition. After trawling, the protein to carbohydrate ratio decreased (as a result of a major input of sedimentary carbohydrates at the water-sediment interface) and the fraction of enzymatically hydrolysable biopolymeric C decreased by ≈30%, thus reducing the bioavailability of resuspended organic particles. Results of the present study indicate that changes in suspended POM, induced by storms and trawling activities, can have similar consequences on benthic systems and on food webs. In fact, the potential benefit of increased organic particle concentration for suspension feeders, is depressed by the shift of suspended food particles towards a more refractory composition.

Impact of natural (storm) and anthropogenic (trawling) sediment resuspension on particulate organic matter in coastal environments

PUSCEDDU, ANTONIO;
2005

Abstract

In order to assess the impact of natural and anthropogenic sediment resuspension on quantity, biochemical composition and bioavailability of particulate organic matter (POM), two field investigations were carried out in two shallow coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In the Gulf of Lions, we investigated the impact of a storm resuspension of sediment, whereas in the Thermaikos Gulf we investigated the impact of bottom trawling. Resuspension in the Gulf of Lions determined the increase of sedimentation rates, modified the composition of the organic fraction of settling particles and decreased the labile fraction of POM, as indicated by a drop in the enzymatically hydrolysable amino acid fraction. The increase in the refractory fraction, following short-term storm-induced resuspension, increased also the contribution of glycine and decreased the contribution of aspartic acid contents to the total amino acid pools. Trawling activities in Thermaikos Gulf determined a significant increase in suspended POM concentrations and important changes in its biochemical composition. After trawling, the protein to carbohydrate ratio decreased (as a result of a major input of sedimentary carbohydrates at the water-sediment interface) and the fraction of enzymatically hydrolysable biopolymeric C decreased by ≈30%, thus reducing the bioavailability of resuspended organic particles. Results of the present study indicate that changes in suspended POM, induced by storms and trawling activities, can have similar consequences on benthic systems and on food webs. In fact, the potential benefit of increased organic particle concentration for suspension feeders, is depressed by the shift of suspended food particles towards a more refractory composition.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/123700
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