Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of brain activity for biometric systems. However, so far these studies have focused mainly on basic features of the Electroencephalography. In this study we propose an approach based on phase synchronization, to investigate personal distinctive brain network organization. To this end, the importance, in terms of centrality, of different regions was determined on the basis of EEG recordings. We hypothesized that nodal centrality enables the accurate identification of individuals. EEG signals from a cohort of 109 64-channels EEGs were band-pass filtered in the classical frequency bands and functional connectivity between the sensors was estimated using the Phase Lag Index. The resulting connectivity matrix was used to construct a weighted network, from which the nodal Eigenvector Centrality was computed. Nodal centrality was successively used as feature vector. Highest recognition rates were observed in the gamma band (equal error rate ( EER) = 0.044 ) and high beta band (EER= 0.102). Slightly lower recognition rate was observed in the low beta band (EER = 0.144), while poor recognition rates were observed for the others frequency bands. The reported results show that resting-state functional brain network topology provides better classification performance than using only a measure of functional connectivity, and may represent an optimal solution for the design of next generation EEG based biometric systems. This study also suggests that results from biometric systems based on high-frequency scalp EEG features should be interpreted with caution.

An EEG-based biometric system using eigenvector centrality in resting state brain networks

FRASCHINI, MATTEO;DEMURU, MATTEO;DIDACI, LUCA;MARCIALIS, GIAN LUCA
2015

Abstract

Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of brain activity for biometric systems. However, so far these studies have focused mainly on basic features of the Electroencephalography. In this study we propose an approach based on phase synchronization, to investigate personal distinctive brain network organization. To this end, the importance, in terms of centrality, of different regions was determined on the basis of EEG recordings. We hypothesized that nodal centrality enables the accurate identification of individuals. EEG signals from a cohort of 109 64-channels EEGs were band-pass filtered in the classical frequency bands and functional connectivity between the sensors was estimated using the Phase Lag Index. The resulting connectivity matrix was used to construct a weighted network, from which the nodal Eigenvector Centrality was computed. Nodal centrality was successively used as feature vector. Highest recognition rates were observed in the gamma band (equal error rate ( EER) = 0.044 ) and high beta band (EER= 0.102). Slightly lower recognition rate was observed in the low beta band (EER = 0.144), while poor recognition rates were observed for the others frequency bands. The reported results show that resting-state functional brain network topology provides better classification performance than using only a measure of functional connectivity, and may represent an optimal solution for the design of next generation EEG based biometric systems. This study also suggests that results from biometric systems based on high-frequency scalp EEG features should be interpreted with caution.
Biometrics; Centrality; EEG; Networks
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/137566
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