Background: 5'-Methylthioadenosine (MTA), a product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) catabolism, could undergo oxidation by mono-oxygenases and auto-oxidation. MTA and SAM effects on oxidative liver injury were evaluated in CCl4-treated rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were killed 1-48 h after poisoning with a single intraperitoneal CCl4 dose (0.15 ml/100 g) or with the same dose twice a week for 14 weeks. Daily doses of MTA or SAM (384 micromol/kg), started 1 week before acute CCl4 administration or with chronic treatment, were continued up to the time of sacrifice. Results: Acute and chronic CCl4 intoxication decreased MTA and, to a lesser extent, SAM and reduced glutathione (GSH) liver levels. MTA administration increased liver MTA without affecting SAM and GSH. SAM treatment caused complete/partial recovery of these compounds. MTA and, to a lesser extent, SAM prevented an increase in liver phospholipid hydroperoxides in acutely and chronically intoxicated rats and in prolyl hydroxylase activity and trichrome-positive areas in chronically treated rats. MTA prevented upregulation of Tgf-beta1, Collagen-alpha1 (I) and Tgf-alpha genes in liver of chronically intoxicated rats, and TGF-beta1-induced transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts and growth stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor-b of stellate cells in vitro. Conclusions: MTA and SAM protect against oxidative liver injury through partially different mechanisms.

5'-Methylthioadenosine Administration Prevents Lipid Peroxidation and Fibrogenesis Induced in Rat Liver by Carbon-tetrachloride Intoxication

BANNI, SEBASTIANO;CARTA, GIANFRANCA;
2001-01-01

Abstract

Background: 5'-Methylthioadenosine (MTA), a product of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) catabolism, could undergo oxidation by mono-oxygenases and auto-oxidation. MTA and SAM effects on oxidative liver injury were evaluated in CCl4-treated rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were killed 1-48 h after poisoning with a single intraperitoneal CCl4 dose (0.15 ml/100 g) or with the same dose twice a week for 14 weeks. Daily doses of MTA or SAM (384 micromol/kg), started 1 week before acute CCl4 administration or with chronic treatment, were continued up to the time of sacrifice. Results: Acute and chronic CCl4 intoxication decreased MTA and, to a lesser extent, SAM and reduced glutathione (GSH) liver levels. MTA administration increased liver MTA without affecting SAM and GSH. SAM treatment caused complete/partial recovery of these compounds. MTA and, to a lesser extent, SAM prevented an increase in liver phospholipid hydroperoxides in acutely and chronically intoxicated rats and in prolyl hydroxylase activity and trichrome-positive areas in chronically treated rats. MTA prevented upregulation of Tgf-beta1, Collagen-alpha1 (I) and Tgf-alpha genes in liver of chronically intoxicated rats, and TGF-beta1-induced transdifferentiation to myofibroblasts and growth stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor-b of stellate cells in vitro. Conclusions: MTA and SAM protect against oxidative liver injury through partially different mechanisms.
2001
hydroperoxides; liver fibrosis; 5 '-methylthioadenosine; antioxidant effect; liver cirrhosis; S-adenosyl-methionine; Tgf-beta 1; Tgf-alpha; collagen-alpha 1 (I); alpha-actin
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/1711
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