Purpose: To analyze whether a large uterine size was associated with increased rate of intraoperative and postoperative surgical complications in patients who underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) for myomatous uteri. Methods: We examined prospectively data from 461 consecutive TLHs performed by a single surgeon between August 2004 and August 2014 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sirai Hospital, Carbonia, and at the Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Businco Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. Demographic and surgical data were stratified by uterine weight (range 90–5500 g) into four groups: <300 g; from 300 to 500 g; from 500 to 800 g; and >800 g. Outcomes examined included blood loss, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and duration of hospital stay. A linear regression analysis was performed to identify whether uterine weight was an independent predictor affecting these outcomes. In addition, BMI, previous surgery with adhesiolysis, and endometriosis were tested as a predictor of surgical complications and outcomes. Results: No significant difference was found in intraoperative and postoperative complications, as well as hospital stay, by uterine weight. Increased uterine size was significantly associated with longer operative time and increased blood loss. Beside uterine weight, prior surgery was predictive of postoperative complications. In contrast, higher BMI was not associated with increased complication rate. Independent predictors of longer operative time included previous surgery, endometriosis, and BMI. Conclusions: Our results showed that in experienced hands, TLH is feasible and safe also in presence of very large uteri. TLH results in a few complications and short hospital stay regardless of uterine weight.

Surgical outcome and complications of total laparoscopic hysterectomy for very large myomatous uteri in relation to uterine weight: a prospective study in a continuous series of 461 procedures

Macciò, Antonio;MADEDDU, CLELIA
2016

Abstract

Purpose: To analyze whether a large uterine size was associated with increased rate of intraoperative and postoperative surgical complications in patients who underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) for myomatous uteri. Methods: We examined prospectively data from 461 consecutive TLHs performed by a single surgeon between August 2004 and August 2014 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sirai Hospital, Carbonia, and at the Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Businco Hospital, Cagliari, Italy. Demographic and surgical data were stratified by uterine weight (range 90–5500 g) into four groups: <300 g; from 300 to 500 g; from 500 to 800 g; and >800 g. Outcomes examined included blood loss, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and duration of hospital stay. A linear regression analysis was performed to identify whether uterine weight was an independent predictor affecting these outcomes. In addition, BMI, previous surgery with adhesiolysis, and endometriosis were tested as a predictor of surgical complications and outcomes. Results: No significant difference was found in intraoperative and postoperative complications, as well as hospital stay, by uterine weight. Increased uterine size was significantly associated with longer operative time and increased blood loss. Beside uterine weight, prior surgery was predictive of postoperative complications. In contrast, higher BMI was not associated with increased complication rate. Independent predictors of longer operative time included previous surgery, endometriosis, and BMI. Conclusions: Our results showed that in experienced hands, TLH is feasible and safe also in presence of very large uteri. TLH results in a few complications and short hospital stay regardless of uterine weight.
Laparoscopy; Large uteri; Mini-invasive surgery; Myomatous uteri; Women’s health; Medicine (all); Obstetrics and Gynecology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/185804
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