AIM To address to what extent hypertrophy and hyperplasia contribute to liver mass restoration after major tissue loss. METHODS The ability of the liver to regenerate is remarkable on both clinical and biological grounds. Basic mechanisms underlying this process have been intensively investigated. However, it is still debated to what extent hypertrophy and hyperplasia contribute to liver mass restoration after major tissue loss. We addressed this issue using a genetically tagged system. We were able to follow the fate of single transplanted hepatocytes during the regenerative response elicited by 2/3 partial surgical hepatectomy (PH) in rats. Clusters of transplanted cells were 3D reconstructed and their size distribution was evaluated over time after PH. RESULTS Liver size and liver DNA content were largely recovered 10 d post-PH, as expected (e.g. , total DNA/liver/100 g b.w. was 6.37 ± 0.21 before PH and returned to 6.10 ± 0.36 10 d after PH). Data indicated that about 2/3 of the original residual hepatocytes entered S-phase in response to PH. Analysis of cluster size distribution at 24, 48, 96 h and 10 d after PH revealed that about half of the remnant hepatocytes completed at least 2 cell cycles. Average size of hepatocytes increased at 24 h (248.50 μm2 ± 7.82 μm2, P = 0.0015), but returned to control values throughout the regenerative process (up to 10 d post-PH, 197.9 μm2 ± 6.44 μm2, P = 0.11). A sizeable fraction of the remnant hepatocyte population does not participate actively in tissue mass restoration. CONCLUSION Hyperplasia stands as the major mechanism contributing to liver mass restoration after PH, with hypertrophy playing a transient role in the process.

Hyperplasia vs hypertrophy in tissue regeneration after extensive liver resection

MARONGIU, FABIO;MARONGIU, MICHELA;CONTINI, ANTONELLA;SERRA, MONICA;CADONI, ERIKA;LACONI, EZIO
2017-01-01

Abstract

AIM To address to what extent hypertrophy and hyperplasia contribute to liver mass restoration after major tissue loss. METHODS The ability of the liver to regenerate is remarkable on both clinical and biological grounds. Basic mechanisms underlying this process have been intensively investigated. However, it is still debated to what extent hypertrophy and hyperplasia contribute to liver mass restoration after major tissue loss. We addressed this issue using a genetically tagged system. We were able to follow the fate of single transplanted hepatocytes during the regenerative response elicited by 2/3 partial surgical hepatectomy (PH) in rats. Clusters of transplanted cells were 3D reconstructed and their size distribution was evaluated over time after PH. RESULTS Liver size and liver DNA content were largely recovered 10 d post-PH, as expected (e.g. , total DNA/liver/100 g b.w. was 6.37 ± 0.21 before PH and returned to 6.10 ± 0.36 10 d after PH). Data indicated that about 2/3 of the original residual hepatocytes entered S-phase in response to PH. Analysis of cluster size distribution at 24, 48, 96 h and 10 d after PH revealed that about half of the remnant hepatocytes completed at least 2 cell cycles. Average size of hepatocytes increased at 24 h (248.50 μm2 ± 7.82 μm2, P = 0.0015), but returned to control values throughout the regenerative process (up to 10 d post-PH, 197.9 μm2 ± 6.44 μm2, P = 0.11). A sizeable fraction of the remnant hepatocyte population does not participate actively in tissue mass restoration. CONCLUSION Hyperplasia stands as the major mechanism contributing to liver mass restoration after PH, with hypertrophy playing a transient role in the process.
Hyperplasia; Hypertrophy; Liver regeneration; Gastroenterology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/211994
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