Background In people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS), balance assessment is essential in estimating the risk of falls, monitoring disease progression and verifying the effectiveness of rehabilitative treatment. Clinical tools and instrumental techniques are available for testing static and dynamic balance, but the relationship between such abilities is still not clear. Having information about this link would be important in properly planning the type and number of tests to administer. Methods One hundred and six pwMS (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS 0−6.5) stratified in three sub-groups (Class 1 EDSS 0–1.5, Class 2 EDSS 2–4 and Class 3 EDSS 4.5–6.5) and 42 healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. All underwent static posturography and instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) performed using a wearable inertial sensor. Raw data were processed to extract postural sway features, overall duration of TUG and its main sub-phases (i.e. sit-to-stand, 180° turns and stand-to-sit). Results All sway parameters of pwMS of Classes 2 and 3, as well as total TUG duration and time necessary to perform 180° turns, were found significantly higher than HC and Class 1 participants. However, poor correlations were found between sway and TUG parameters. When pwMS are grouped, small/moderate correlations (in the range 0.20–0.41) were found between all sway parameters and total TUG duration. Conclusions Static and dynamic balance in pwMS appear scarcely correlated, although both worsen as disability increases. This implies that they should be separately assessed using specific tests to have a complete view of postural control performance in MS.

Are static and functional balance abilities related in individuals with Multiple Sclerosis?

PAU, MASSIMILIANO;PORTA, MICAELA;COGHE, GIANCARLO;CORONA, FEDERICA;PILLONI, GIUSEPPINA;LOREFICE, LORENA;MARROSU, MARIA GIOVANNA;COCCO, ELEONORA
2017

Abstract

Background In people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS), balance assessment is essential in estimating the risk of falls, monitoring disease progression and verifying the effectiveness of rehabilitative treatment. Clinical tools and instrumental techniques are available for testing static and dynamic balance, but the relationship between such abilities is still not clear. Having information about this link would be important in properly planning the type and number of tests to administer. Methods One hundred and six pwMS (Expanded Disability Status Scale, EDSS 0−6.5) stratified in three sub-groups (Class 1 EDSS 0–1.5, Class 2 EDSS 2–4 and Class 3 EDSS 4.5–6.5) and 42 healthy controls (HC) participated in the study. All underwent static posturography and instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) performed using a wearable inertial sensor. Raw data were processed to extract postural sway features, overall duration of TUG and its main sub-phases (i.e. sit-to-stand, 180° turns and stand-to-sit). Results All sway parameters of pwMS of Classes 2 and 3, as well as total TUG duration and time necessary to perform 180° turns, were found significantly higher than HC and Class 1 participants. However, poor correlations were found between sway and TUG parameters. When pwMS are grouped, small/moderate correlations (in the range 0.20–0.41) were found between all sway parameters and total TUG duration. Conclusions Static and dynamic balance in pwMS appear scarcely correlated, although both worsen as disability increases. This implies that they should be separately assessed using specific tests to have a complete view of postural control performance in MS.
Balance; Posturography; Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG); Neurology; Neurology (clinical)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/212297
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