Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and Sardinian alcohol-non preferring (sNP) rats have been selectively bred for opposite alcohol preference and consumption. Aiming to verify possible differences at the proteomics level between sP and sNP rats, we investigated the salivary proteome by a a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry top-down-bottom-up integrated approach. For this purpose, submandibular saliva was collected from alcohol-naive sP and sNP rats under isoprenaline stimulation. A total of 200 peptides and proteins were detected and quantified in the two rat lines, 149 of which were characterized in their naturally occurring structure. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006997. Surprisingly, sP rats exhibited marked quantitative and qualitative differences with respect to sNP rats, namely higher levels of proteoforms originating from submandibular gland protein C, and from submandibular rat protein 2, as well as those of several unidentified peptides and proteins. sP rats expressed some proteins not detectable in sNP rats such as the glutamine and glutamic acid-rich protein (GRP)-CB. The isoform GRP-B, detectable in both rat lines, was more abundant in sNP rats. The submandibular saliva of sNP rats was also characterized by very high levels of GRP-B proteolytic peptides and rat salivary protein 1. Whether these differences could contribute to the opposite alcohol preference and consumption of sP and sNP rats is currently unknown and requires further investigation.

Marked differences in the submandibular salivary proteome between Sardinian alcohol-preferring and Sardinian alcohol-non preferring rats revealed by an integrated top-down-bottom-up proteomic platform

Cabras, Tiziana;D'alessandro, Alfredo;Serrao, Simone;Isola, Raffaella;Messana, Irene;Castagnola, Massimo
2018-01-01

Abstract

Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and Sardinian alcohol-non preferring (sNP) rats have been selectively bred for opposite alcohol preference and consumption. Aiming to verify possible differences at the proteomics level between sP and sNP rats, we investigated the salivary proteome by a a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry top-down-bottom-up integrated approach. For this purpose, submandibular saliva was collected from alcohol-naive sP and sNP rats under isoprenaline stimulation. A total of 200 peptides and proteins were detected and quantified in the two rat lines, 149 of which were characterized in their naturally occurring structure. The data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006997. Surprisingly, sP rats exhibited marked quantitative and qualitative differences with respect to sNP rats, namely higher levels of proteoforms originating from submandibular gland protein C, and from submandibular rat protein 2, as well as those of several unidentified peptides and proteins. sP rats expressed some proteins not detectable in sNP rats such as the glutamine and glutamic acid-rich protein (GRP)-CB. The isoform GRP-B, detectable in both rat lines, was more abundant in sNP rats. The submandibular saliva of sNP rats was also characterized by very high levels of GRP-B proteolytic peptides and rat salivary protein 1. Whether these differences could contribute to the opposite alcohol preference and consumption of sP and sNP rats is currently unknown and requires further investigation.
GRPs; HPLC−ESI−MS; RSP1; SMGC; SMR2; Sardinian alcohol-non preferring rats; Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats; Rat saliva; Submandibular gland; Top-down−bottom-up proteomics
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
acs.jproteome_PDF_senza_pag.pdf

Open Access dal 16/12/2018

Tipologia: versione post-print
Dimensione 932.6 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
932.6 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/229535
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact