Background The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with relapse in panic disorder (PD). Methods This was an observational study conducted in the outpatient clinic of a psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In a previous study, 120 patients diagnosed as having PD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria were randomized to receive clonazepam or paroxetine. After 3 years, treatment was discontinued in patients who had achieved remission. These subjects were included in the current study and were followed up for 6 years. The follow-up assessments were made at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 years after treatment discontinuation. Assessment included the number of panic attacks per month, Clinical Global Impression-Severity, and other measures. Patients who had initiated psychotherapy or pharmacological treatment because of PD symptoms or who had Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores greater than 1 or panic attacks in the month preceding the assessment were considered relapse cases. Data were collected from January 2003 to August 2012. Results Eighty-five patients completed the follow-up. Cumulative relapse rates were 50% (n = 33) at 1 year and 89.4% (n = 76) at 6 years. One-year relapse rates were lower in patients previously treated with clonazepam (P = 0.001) compared with those treated with paroxetine. Low 6-year relapse rates were associated with high Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores before treatment (P = 0.016) and previous treatment with clonazepam. Conclusions Relapse is a frequent problem in PD, and long-term treatment does not protect these patients in the long run. Treatment with clonazepam predicts lower relapse when compared with paroxetine.

A 6-Year Posttreatment Follow-up of Panic Disorder Patients: Treatment With Clonazepam Predicts Lower Recurrence Than Treatment With Paroxetine

Carta MG;Nardi AE
2017-01-01

Abstract

Background The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with relapse in panic disorder (PD). Methods This was an observational study conducted in the outpatient clinic of a psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In a previous study, 120 patients diagnosed as having PD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria were randomized to receive clonazepam or paroxetine. After 3 years, treatment was discontinued in patients who had achieved remission. These subjects were included in the current study and were followed up for 6 years. The follow-up assessments were made at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 years after treatment discontinuation. Assessment included the number of panic attacks per month, Clinical Global Impression-Severity, and other measures. Patients who had initiated psychotherapy or pharmacological treatment because of PD symptoms or who had Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores greater than 1 or panic attacks in the month preceding the assessment were considered relapse cases. Data were collected from January 2003 to August 2012. Results Eighty-five patients completed the follow-up. Cumulative relapse rates were 50% (n = 33) at 1 year and 89.4% (n = 76) at 6 years. One-year relapse rates were lower in patients previously treated with clonazepam (P = 0.001) compared with those treated with paroxetine. Low 6-year relapse rates were associated with high Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores before treatment (P = 0.016) and previous treatment with clonazepam. Conclusions Relapse is a frequent problem in PD, and long-term treatment does not protect these patients in the long run. Treatment with clonazepam predicts lower relapse when compared with paroxetine.
2017
Agoraphobia; Clonazepam; Panic disorder; Paroxetine; Recurrence
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/238439
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