Cannabis use is typically initiated during adolescence and is a significant risk factor for the development of cocaine use in adulthood. However, no preclinical studies have examined the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on cocaine dependence in adulthood using the escalation model of cocaine self-administration and the assessment of negative emotional states. In the present study, we found that exposure to the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) in adolescence produced irritability-like behavior and psychomotor cross-sensitization to cocaine in adolescence. In adulthood, rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine. The acquisition of cocaine self-administration was lower in rats with adolescent WIN exposure compared with controls. However, both WIN-exposed and control rats escalated their cocaine intake at the same rate, had similar responding under a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement, and had similar psychomotor responses to cocaine. Interestingly, the increase in irritability-like behavior that was previously observed in adolescence after WIN exposure persisted into adulthood. Whether the persisting increase in irritability-like behavior after WIN exposure has translational relevance remains to be studied. In summary, these results suggest that psychoactive cannabinoid exposure during adolescence is unlikely to have a major effect on the escalation of cocaine intake or the development of compulsive-like responding per se in adulthood in a rat model of cocaine self-administration. However, whether the persisting irritability-like behavior may predispose an individual to mood-related impairments in adulthood or predict such impairments warrants further investigation.

Adolescent cannabinoid exposure induces irritability-like behavior and cocaine cross-sensitization without affecting the escalation of cocaine self-administration in adulthood

Scherma, Maria;Fadda, Paola;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Cannabis use is typically initiated during adolescence and is a significant risk factor for the development of cocaine use in adulthood. However, no preclinical studies have examined the effects of adolescent cannabinoid exposure on cocaine dependence in adulthood using the escalation model of cocaine self-administration and the assessment of negative emotional states. In the present study, we found that exposure to the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) in adolescence produced irritability-like behavior and psychomotor cross-sensitization to cocaine in adolescence. In adulthood, rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine. The acquisition of cocaine self-administration was lower in rats with adolescent WIN exposure compared with controls. However, both WIN-exposed and control rats escalated their cocaine intake at the same rate, had similar responding under a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement, and had similar psychomotor responses to cocaine. Interestingly, the increase in irritability-like behavior that was previously observed in adolescence after WIN exposure persisted into adulthood. Whether the persisting increase in irritability-like behavior after WIN exposure has translational relevance remains to be studied. In summary, these results suggest that psychoactive cannabinoid exposure during adolescence is unlikely to have a major effect on the escalation of cocaine intake or the development of compulsive-like responding per se in adulthood in a rat model of cocaine self-administration. However, whether the persisting irritability-like behavior may predispose an individual to mood-related impairments in adulthood or predict such impairments warrants further investigation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/250935
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