The neurophysiological hallmark of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is loss of atonia during REM sleep. Indeed, signs and symptoms of neurodegeneration can occur after years, even decades, from its beginning. This study aimed to measure neurophysiological alterations of the brainstem that potentially correlate with the severity of atonia loss, and determining whether a prodromal neurodegenerative disorder underlines this condition when it occurs as an isolated condition (iRBD). Methods: Subjects with iRBD and matched healthy controls were recruited. The study included the recording of one-night polysomnography, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and a [123I]-FP-CIT dopamine transporter (DAT) scan. The quantification of REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) was made according to two previously published manual methods and one automated method. Results: The rate of alteration of VEMPs and VEMP score were significantly higher in iRBD patients than controls. Moreover, VEMP score was negatively correlated with the automated REM atonia index; a marginal statistical significance was also reached for the positive correlation with the visual tonic electromyographic parameter, while the other correlations, including that with DAT-scan score were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Brainstem neurophysiology in iRBD can be assessed by VEMPs and their alterations may possibly indicate an early expression of the neurodegenerative process underlying this disorder at the brainstem level, which awaits future longitudinal confirmation. The correlation between RSWA and VEMP alteration might also represent a prodromal aspect anticipating the possible evolution from iRBD to neurodegeneration, whereas DAT-scan abnormalities might represent a later step in this evolution.

REM Sleep without atonia correlates with abnormal vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in isolated REM sleep behavior disorder

Puligheddu, Monica
Primo
;
Figorilli, Michela;Serra, Alessandra;Laccu, Ilaria;Congiu, Patrizia;Tamburrino, Ludovica;
2019-01-01

Abstract

The neurophysiological hallmark of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is loss of atonia during REM sleep. Indeed, signs and symptoms of neurodegeneration can occur after years, even decades, from its beginning. This study aimed to measure neurophysiological alterations of the brainstem that potentially correlate with the severity of atonia loss, and determining whether a prodromal neurodegenerative disorder underlines this condition when it occurs as an isolated condition (iRBD). Methods: Subjects with iRBD and matched healthy controls were recruited. The study included the recording of one-night polysomnography, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and a [123I]-FP-CIT dopamine transporter (DAT) scan. The quantification of REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) was made according to two previously published manual methods and one automated method. Results: The rate of alteration of VEMPs and VEMP score were significantly higher in iRBD patients than controls. Moreover, VEMP score was negatively correlated with the automated REM atonia index; a marginal statistical significance was also reached for the positive correlation with the visual tonic electromyographic parameter, while the other correlations, including that with DAT-scan score were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Brainstem neurophysiology in iRBD can be assessed by VEMPs and their alterations may possibly indicate an early expression of the neurodegenerative process underlying this disorder at the brainstem level, which awaits future longitudinal confirmation. The correlation between RSWA and VEMP alteration might also represent a prodromal aspect anticipating the possible evolution from iRBD to neurodegeneration, whereas DAT-scan abnormalities might represent a later step in this evolution.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
REM Sleep without atonia correlates with abnormal vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in isolated REM sleep behavior disorder..pdf

Solo gestori archivio

Tipologia: versione post-print
Dimensione 398.64 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
398.64 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/273790
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 16
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 17
social impact