Objective: People with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) often exhibit generalized weakness that affects several activities of daily life, particularly those relying on balance and gait. While it is known that such a symptom has a strong impact on mobility, to what extent muscular strength is linked with functional mobility in men and women with MS remains mostly unexplored. The aim of this study is to assess the existence of possible sex-related differences in functional mobility in pwMS, also considering the muscular strength capacity. Methods: Functional mobility and hand-grip strength (HGS) were assessed in 49 pwMS with mild- moderate disability using instrumental Timed-up-and-go (TUG) test carried out using an inertial sensor and digital dynamometry. We investigated the existence of sex-related differences in the duration of each TUG sub-phase and their correlation with the HGS. Results: No sex-related differences in TUG performance (either in terms of overall or sub-phase time) were found. Similar large negative correlations were found in men and women with MS between HGS and overall TUG and walking phase duration. However, changes in strength have a more marked impact in women as indicated by the different slope of the HGS-TUG time relationship., In women, HGS also appears signi!cantly correlated with all TUG sub-phases, while in men this occurs only for overall TUG and walking time. Conclusions: Rehabilitation and training programs for pwMS should take into account the peculiar features associated with the interaction between strength and mobility speci!c for each individual's sex to optimize their effectiveness.

Timed Up and Go in men and women with Multiple Sclerosis: effect of muscular strength

Pau, Massimiliano
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Porta, Micaela
Formal Analysis
;
Cocco, Eleonora
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2020-01-01

Abstract

Objective: People with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) often exhibit generalized weakness that affects several activities of daily life, particularly those relying on balance and gait. While it is known that such a symptom has a strong impact on mobility, to what extent muscular strength is linked with functional mobility in men and women with MS remains mostly unexplored. The aim of this study is to assess the existence of possible sex-related differences in functional mobility in pwMS, also considering the muscular strength capacity. Methods: Functional mobility and hand-grip strength (HGS) were assessed in 49 pwMS with mild- moderate disability using instrumental Timed-up-and-go (TUG) test carried out using an inertial sensor and digital dynamometry. We investigated the existence of sex-related differences in the duration of each TUG sub-phase and their correlation with the HGS. Results: No sex-related differences in TUG performance (either in terms of overall or sub-phase time) were found. Similar large negative correlations were found in men and women with MS between HGS and overall TUG and walking phase duration. However, changes in strength have a more marked impact in women as indicated by the different slope of the HGS-TUG time relationship., In women, HGS also appears signi!cantly correlated with all TUG sub-phases, while in men this occurs only for overall TUG and walking time. Conclusions: Rehabilitation and training programs for pwMS should take into account the peculiar features associated with the interaction between strength and mobility speci!c for each individual's sex to optimize their effectiveness.
2020
Functional balance; Handgrip strength (HGS; )Multiple sclerosis; Timed-up-and-go (TUG)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/293997
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