Background: Upper extremity transplantation (UET) is becoming increasingly common. This article attempts to collate data from cases contributing to the International Registry on Hand and Composite Tissue Transplantation (IRHCTT), define psychosocial themes perceived as predictors of success using statistical methods, and provide an objective measure for optimization and selection of candidates. Methods: The IRHCTT provided anonymous data on UET recipients. A supple- mentary psychosocial survey was developed focusing on themes of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, interpersonal functioning and dependence, compliance, chronic pain, social support, quality of life, and patient expectations. We determined the risk of transplant loss and psychological factors associated with higher risk of transplant loss. Results: Sixty-two UET recipients reported to the IRHCTT. Forty-three psychoso- cial surveys (68%) were received, with 38 (88%) having intact transplants and 5 (12%) being amputated. Among recipients with a diagnosis of anxiety (N = 29, 67%), 5 (17%) reported transplant loss (P = 0.03). Among those with depression (N = 14, 33%), 2 recipients (14%) has transplant loss (P = 0.17); while 4 recipients (22%) with PTSD (N = 18, 42%) had transplant loss (P = 0.01). Of participants active in occupational therapy (N = 28, 65%), 2 (7%) reported transplant loss (P = 0.09). Of recipients with realistic functional expectations (N = 34, 79%), 2 (6%) had transplant loss versus 3 (34%) who were felt to not have realistic expec- tations (N = 9, 21%, P = 0.05). Recipients with strong family support (N = 33, 77%) had a lower risk of transplant loss compared with poor or fair family support (N = 10, 23%), but did not reach statistical significance (6% versus 30%, P = 0.14). Conclusion: Anxiety, depression, PTSD, participation in occupational therapy, expectations for posttransplant function, and family support are associated with postsurgical transplant status.

Psychosocial predictors of upper extremity transplantation outcomes: A review of the international registry 1998–2016

Palmina Petruzzo;Claudia Sardu;
2020

Abstract

Background: Upper extremity transplantation (UET) is becoming increasingly common. This article attempts to collate data from cases contributing to the International Registry on Hand and Composite Tissue Transplantation (IRHCTT), define psychosocial themes perceived as predictors of success using statistical methods, and provide an objective measure for optimization and selection of candidates. Methods: The IRHCTT provided anonymous data on UET recipients. A supple- mentary psychosocial survey was developed focusing on themes of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, interpersonal functioning and dependence, compliance, chronic pain, social support, quality of life, and patient expectations. We determined the risk of transplant loss and psychological factors associated with higher risk of transplant loss. Results: Sixty-two UET recipients reported to the IRHCTT. Forty-three psychoso- cial surveys (68%) were received, with 38 (88%) having intact transplants and 5 (12%) being amputated. Among recipients with a diagnosis of anxiety (N = 29, 67%), 5 (17%) reported transplant loss (P = 0.03). Among those with depression (N = 14, 33%), 2 recipients (14%) has transplant loss (P = 0.17); while 4 recipients (22%) with PTSD (N = 18, 42%) had transplant loss (P = 0.01). Of participants active in occupational therapy (N = 28, 65%), 2 (7%) reported transplant loss (P = 0.09). Of recipients with realistic functional expectations (N = 34, 79%), 2 (6%) had transplant loss versus 3 (34%) who were felt to not have realistic expec- tations (N = 9, 21%, P = 0.05). Recipients with strong family support (N = 33, 77%) had a lower risk of transplant loss compared with poor or fair family support (N = 10, 23%), but did not reach statistical significance (6% versus 30%, P = 0.14). Conclusion: Anxiety, depression, PTSD, participation in occupational therapy, expectations for posttransplant function, and family support are associated with postsurgical transplant status.
rating-scale; hand
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Psychosocial_Predictors_of_Upper_Extremity.20.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: versione editoriale
Dimensione 581.5 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
581.5 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11584/297957
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact