The risk stratification of young adults between subjects who will develop a mild form of atherosclerosis and subjects who will undergo a severe disease remains inaccurate. In the eighties of the previous century, David JP Barker has demonstrated the relationship between fetal conditions and occurrence of pathologies in adulthood. In this paper, the multiple evidence that might explain the increased susceptibility to severe forms of atherosclerosis, including stroke and cardiac infarct, in subjects who underwent intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) will be analyzed. Specifically, we will review those inter-connected data indicating an association between a low weight at birth and an adult phenotype which might favor a severe outcome of atherosclerosis. Young and adult subjects born too small (IUGR) or too early (pre-terms) might represent a subgroup of "at risk subjects", more susceptible toward severe forms of atherosclerosis. Given that low birth weight (LBW) may be considered a surrogate of IUGR, this phenotypic feature could be considered among those indispensable clinical data collected in every patient presenting with atherosclerosis, irrespectively of age. According to the hypothesis that structural arterial changes might represent the link between LBW and susceptibility to atherosclerosis later in life, we suggest that the prevention of atherosclerosis should begin at birth. Regenerative and physiological substances such as thymosin Beta-4 could be challenged for a new "arterial regenerative medicine" in the perinatal period. The goal of this new approach should be the reinforcement of the structure of the arterial wall, allowing LBW newborns to avoid the most severe complications of atherosclerosis later in life: a dream that our research could contribute to bringing to life.

Fetal programming of atherosclerosis: may the barker hypothesis explain the susceptibility of a subset of patients to develop stroke or cardiac infarct?

Gerosa, C;Faa, G;Fanni, D;Cerrone, G;Barcellona, D;Coni, P;Congiu, T;Piras, M;Balestrieri, A;Cau, R;Orru', G;Scano, A;La Nasa, G;Campagna, M;Castagnola, M;Marongiu, F;Saba, L
Ultimo
2021-01-01

Abstract

The risk stratification of young adults between subjects who will develop a mild form of atherosclerosis and subjects who will undergo a severe disease remains inaccurate. In the eighties of the previous century, David JP Barker has demonstrated the relationship between fetal conditions and occurrence of pathologies in adulthood. In this paper, the multiple evidence that might explain the increased susceptibility to severe forms of atherosclerosis, including stroke and cardiac infarct, in subjects who underwent intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) will be analyzed. Specifically, we will review those inter-connected data indicating an association between a low weight at birth and an adult phenotype which might favor a severe outcome of atherosclerosis. Young and adult subjects born too small (IUGR) or too early (pre-terms) might represent a subgroup of "at risk subjects", more susceptible toward severe forms of atherosclerosis. Given that low birth weight (LBW) may be considered a surrogate of IUGR, this phenotypic feature could be considered among those indispensable clinical data collected in every patient presenting with atherosclerosis, irrespectively of age. According to the hypothesis that structural arterial changes might represent the link between LBW and susceptibility to atherosclerosis later in life, we suggest that the prevention of atherosclerosis should begin at birth. Regenerative and physiological substances such as thymosin Beta-4 could be challenged for a new "arterial regenerative medicine" in the perinatal period. The goal of this new approach should be the reinforcement of the structure of the arterial wall, allowing LBW newborns to avoid the most severe complications of atherosclerosis later in life: a dream that our research could contribute to bringing to life.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/322795
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