Sedentary behavior has increased steadily over prior decades, primarily due to increased computer use at work and at home. The total sedentary time per day has been associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases; increased sitting time at work has been associated with musculoskeletal discomfort particularly in the low back. Office workers spend many hours sitting, thus efforts to increase movement through changes of posture (sit to stand) or moving while sitting have been proposed as ways to mitigate the negative effects of prolonged sitting. Yet, few studies have investigated differences in the movement patterns of office workers while sitting performing their actual work. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize movement patterns during a prolonged sitting bout and to determine their association with musculoskeletal pain. Twenty-eight office workers participated in this field study that used a pressure sensitive mat to quantify seat pan pressure (4 regions) and trunk sway parameters over a 2-hour bout of computer work. Data were stratified by breaers who stood up at least once within the 2-hour test and prolongers who remained sitting throughout the test. Overall, there was a decreasing trend in trunk sway parameters (mean COP position, sway path, sway area, sway velocity, maximum displacement, and in-chair movements) over time (p ! 0.05), with significant changes in sitting strategies. There were significant differences in trunk sway parameters and perceived musculoskeletal discomfort between brea ers and prolongers with breaers having more consistent movement while sitting over the prolonged sitting bout (p ! 0.05) and lower discomfort ratings. This may indicate that interrupting prolonged bouts of sitting with short periods of standing can maintain sitting movement patterns and reduce the development of musculoskeletal discomfort. Trunk sway monitoring and promoting periodic standing may be useful tools for maintaining in chair movements that may reduce or prevent the onset of musculoskeletal discomfort during prolonged sitting.

Postural strategies among office workers during a prolonged sitting bout

Arippa, Federico
Primo
Conceptualization
;
Pau, Massimiliano
Penultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Sedentary behavior has increased steadily over prior decades, primarily due to increased computer use at work and at home. The total sedentary time per day has been associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases; increased sitting time at work has been associated with musculoskeletal discomfort particularly in the low back. Office workers spend many hours sitting, thus efforts to increase movement through changes of posture (sit to stand) or moving while sitting have been proposed as ways to mitigate the negative effects of prolonged sitting. Yet, few studies have investigated differences in the movement patterns of office workers while sitting performing their actual work. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize movement patterns during a prolonged sitting bout and to determine their association with musculoskeletal pain. Twenty-eight office workers participated in this field study that used a pressure sensitive mat to quantify seat pan pressure (4 regions) and trunk sway parameters over a 2-hour bout of computer work. Data were stratified by breaers who stood up at least once within the 2-hour test and prolongers who remained sitting throughout the test. Overall, there was a decreasing trend in trunk sway parameters (mean COP position, sway path, sway area, sway velocity, maximum displacement, and in-chair movements) over time (p ! 0.05), with significant changes in sitting strategies. There were significant differences in trunk sway parameters and perceived musculoskeletal discomfort between brea ers and prolongers with breaers having more consistent movement while sitting over the prolonged sitting bout (p ! 0.05) and lower discomfort ratings. This may indicate that interrupting prolonged bouts of sitting with short periods of standing can maintain sitting movement patterns and reduce the development of musculoskeletal discomfort. Trunk sway monitoring and promoting periodic standing may be useful tools for maintaining in chair movements that may reduce or prevent the onset of musculoskeletal discomfort during prolonged sitting.
2022
Sitting posture; Trunk postural sway; Prolonged sitting; In-chair-movements
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/329533
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