Neural oscillations in the gamma frequency band have been identified as a fundament for synaptic plasticity dynamics and their alterations are central in various psychiatric and neurological conditions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and alternating electrical stimulation (tACS) may have a strong therapeutic potential by promoting gamma oscillations expression and plasticity. Here we applied intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS), an established TMS protocol known to induce LTP-like cortical plasticity, simultaneously with transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at either theta (theta tACS) or gamma (gamma tACS) frequency on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). We used TMS in combination with electroencephalography (EEG) to evaluate changes in cortical activity on both left/right DLPFC and over the vertex. We found that simultaneous iTBS with gamma tACS but not with theta tACS resulted in an enhancement of spectral gamma power, a trend in shift of individual peak frequency towards faster oscillations and an increase of local connectivity in the gamma band. Furthermore, the response to the neuromodulatory protocol, in terms of gamma oscillations and connectivity, were directly correlated with the initial level of cortical excitability. These results were specific to the DLPFC and confined locally to the site of stimulation, not being detectable in the contralateral DLPFC. We argue that the results described here could promote a new and effective method able to induce long-lasting changes in brain plasticity useful to be clinically applied to several psychiatric and neurological conditions.

Simultaneous transcranial electrical and magnetic stimulation boost gamma oscillations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

Rocchi, Lorenzo
Formal Analysis
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Neural oscillations in the gamma frequency band have been identified as a fundament for synaptic plasticity dynamics and their alterations are central in various psychiatric and neurological conditions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and alternating electrical stimulation (tACS) may have a strong therapeutic potential by promoting gamma oscillations expression and plasticity. Here we applied intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS), an established TMS protocol known to induce LTP-like cortical plasticity, simultaneously with transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at either theta (theta tACS) or gamma (gamma tACS) frequency on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). We used TMS in combination with electroencephalography (EEG) to evaluate changes in cortical activity on both left/right DLPFC and over the vertex. We found that simultaneous iTBS with gamma tACS but not with theta tACS resulted in an enhancement of spectral gamma power, a trend in shift of individual peak frequency towards faster oscillations and an increase of local connectivity in the gamma band. Furthermore, the response to the neuromodulatory protocol, in terms of gamma oscillations and connectivity, were directly correlated with the initial level of cortical excitability. These results were specific to the DLPFC and confined locally to the site of stimulation, not being detectable in the contralateral DLPFC. We argue that the results described here could promote a new and effective method able to induce long-lasting changes in brain plasticity useful to be clinically applied to several psychiatric and neurological conditions.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2022 - Maiella - Simultaneous transcranial electrical and magnetic stimulation boost gamma oscillations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: versione editoriale
Dimensione 8.56 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
8.56 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/350262
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact