The scientific advances of recent years have made available to anyone affordable hardware devices capable of doing something unthinkable until a few years ago, the reading of brain waves. It means that through small wearable devices it is possible to perform an electroencephalography (EEG), albeit with less potential than those offered by high-cost professional devices. Such devices make it possible for researchers a huge number of experiments that were once impossible in many areas due to the high costs of the necessary hardware. Many studies in the literature explore the use of EEG data as a biometric approach for people identification, but, unfortunately, it presents problems mainly related to the difficulty of extracting unique and stable patterns from users, despite the adoption of sophisticated techniques. An approach to face this problem is based on the evoked potentials (EPs), external stimuli applied during the EEG reading, a noninvasive technique used for many years in clinical routine, in combination with other diagnostic tests, to evaluate the electrical activity related to some areas of the brain and spinal cord to diagnose neurological disorders. In consideration of the growing number of works in the literature that combine the EEG and EP approaches for biometric purposes, this work aims to evaluate the practical feasibility of such approaches as reliable biometric instruments for user identification by surveying the state of the art of the last 6 years, also providing an overview of the elements and concepts related to this research area.

Influencing brain waves by evoked potentials as biometric approach: taking stock of the last six years of research

Saia R.
;
Carta S.;Fenu G.;Pompianu L.
2023-01-01

Abstract

The scientific advances of recent years have made available to anyone affordable hardware devices capable of doing something unthinkable until a few years ago, the reading of brain waves. It means that through small wearable devices it is possible to perform an electroencephalography (EEG), albeit with less potential than those offered by high-cost professional devices. Such devices make it possible for researchers a huge number of experiments that were once impossible in many areas due to the high costs of the necessary hardware. Many studies in the literature explore the use of EEG data as a biometric approach for people identification, but, unfortunately, it presents problems mainly related to the difficulty of extracting unique and stable patterns from users, despite the adoption of sophisticated techniques. An approach to face this problem is based on the evoked potentials (EPs), external stimuli applied during the EEG reading, a noninvasive technique used for many years in clinical routine, in combination with other diagnostic tests, to evaluate the electrical activity related to some areas of the brain and spinal cord to diagnose neurological disorders. In consideration of the growing number of works in the literature that combine the EEG and EP approaches for biometric purposes, this work aims to evaluate the practical feasibility of such approaches as reliable biometric instruments for user identification by surveying the state of the art of the last 6 years, also providing an overview of the elements and concepts related to this research area.
2023
Security
biometric
Brain waves
Electroencephalography
EEG
Evoked potential
EP
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/379303
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