The aim of this paper is to verify if people with a positive score on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) without comorbidity of mood disorders showed a worse level of Health-related Quality of life (HRQol) compared to a control-matched sample of MDQ negatives, identifying a specific syndrome. This is a case-control study based on a database from a community survey. Cases: MDQ-positive without mood disorders; Controls: MDQ negatives matched by sex, age, and psychiatric diagnosis according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) criteria. Tools: MDQ, the Advanced Neuropsychiatric Tools and Assessment Schedule (ANTAS) semi-structured interview for psychiatric diagnosis, and the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12) for measuring HRQol. People scoring positive on the MDQ without a diagnosis of mood disorders showed significantly lower scores on the SF-12 compared to people of the same age and of the same sex with an equal diagnosis of psychiatric disorders not related to mood disorders (35.21 ± 6.30 vs. 41.48 ± 3.39, p < 0.0001). In the debate whether a positive score on the MDQ selects an area of “malaise” due to the presence of disorders differing from Bipolar Disorders, or if a positive score on the MDQ may be considered a “subthreshold” form of bipolar disorder in people who may later develop bipolar disorder, a third hypothesis can be advanced, i.e., that a positive score on the MDQ identifies a specific “Dysregulation of Mood, Energy, and Social Rhythms Syndrome” (DYMERS), characterized by a considerable amount of suffering and not attributable to other disorders, and which might represent a trigger for the previously mentioned disorders with which a positive score on the MDQ is associated, probably including, in severe conditions, bipolar disorder.

Does Screening for Bipolar Disorders Identify a “Dysregulation of Mood, Energy, and Social Rhythms Syndrome” (DYMERS)? A Heuristic Working Hypothesis

Carta M. G.;Kalcev G.;Pinna S.;Nardi A. E.;Primavera D.
2023-01-01

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to verify if people with a positive score on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) without comorbidity of mood disorders showed a worse level of Health-related Quality of life (HRQol) compared to a control-matched sample of MDQ negatives, identifying a specific syndrome. This is a case-control study based on a database from a community survey. Cases: MDQ-positive without mood disorders; Controls: MDQ negatives matched by sex, age, and psychiatric diagnosis according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) criteria. Tools: MDQ, the Advanced Neuropsychiatric Tools and Assessment Schedule (ANTAS) semi-structured interview for psychiatric diagnosis, and the Health Survey Short Form (SF-12) for measuring HRQol. People scoring positive on the MDQ without a diagnosis of mood disorders showed significantly lower scores on the SF-12 compared to people of the same age and of the same sex with an equal diagnosis of psychiatric disorders not related to mood disorders (35.21 ± 6.30 vs. 41.48 ± 3.39, p < 0.0001). In the debate whether a positive score on the MDQ selects an area of “malaise” due to the presence of disorders differing from Bipolar Disorders, or if a positive score on the MDQ may be considered a “subthreshold” form of bipolar disorder in people who may later develop bipolar disorder, a third hypothesis can be advanced, i.e., that a positive score on the MDQ identifies a specific “Dysregulation of Mood, Energy, and Social Rhythms Syndrome” (DYMERS), characterized by a considerable amount of suffering and not attributable to other disorders, and which might represent a trigger for the previously mentioned disorders with which a positive score on the MDQ is associated, probably including, in severe conditions, bipolar disorder.
2023
Comorbidities; DYMERS; MDQ; Mood disorders; SF-12; Social rhythms
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/384421
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