Excessive predominance of pathological species in the gut microbiota could increase the production of inflammatory mediators at the gut level and, via modification of the gut–blood barrier, at the systemic level. This pro-inflammatory state could, in turn, increase biological aging that is generally proxied by telomere shortening. In this study, we present findings from a secondary interaction analysis of gut microbiota, aging, and inflammatory marker data from a cohort of patients with different diagnoses of severe mental disorders. We analyzed 15 controls, 35 patients with schizophrenia (SCZ), and 31 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) recruited among those attending a community mental health center (50 males and 31 females, mean and median age 46.8 and 46.3 years, respectively). We performed 16S rRNA sequencing as well as measurement of telomere length via quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We applied statistical modeling with logistic regression to test for interaction between gut microbiota and these markers. Our results showed statistically significant interactions between telomere length and gut microbiota pointing to the genus Lachnostridium, which remained significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of MDD even after adjustment for a series of covariates. Although exploratory, these findings show that specific gut microbiota signatures overexpressing Lachnoclostridium and interacting with biological aging could modulate the liability for MDD.

A Pilot Interaction Analysis of Gut Microbiota and Peripheral Markers of Aging in Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Role for Lachnoclostridium?

Manchia, Mirko
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Paribello, Pasquale;Pisanu, Claudia;Congiu, Donatella;Pinna, Federica;Caria, Paola;Dettori, Tinuccia;Frau, Daniela Virginia;Cocco, Cristina;Noli, Barbara;Carpiniello, Bernardo;Squassina, Alessio
Ultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
2023-01-01

Abstract

Excessive predominance of pathological species in the gut microbiota could increase the production of inflammatory mediators at the gut level and, via modification of the gut–blood barrier, at the systemic level. This pro-inflammatory state could, in turn, increase biological aging that is generally proxied by telomere shortening. In this study, we present findings from a secondary interaction analysis of gut microbiota, aging, and inflammatory marker data from a cohort of patients with different diagnoses of severe mental disorders. We analyzed 15 controls, 35 patients with schizophrenia (SCZ), and 31 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) recruited among those attending a community mental health center (50 males and 31 females, mean and median age 46.8 and 46.3 years, respectively). We performed 16S rRNA sequencing as well as measurement of telomere length via quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We applied statistical modeling with logistic regression to test for interaction between gut microbiota and these markers. Our results showed statistically significant interactions between telomere length and gut microbiota pointing to the genus Lachnostridium, which remained significantly associated with a reduced likelihood of MDD even after adjustment for a series of covariates. Although exploratory, these findings show that specific gut microbiota signatures overexpressing Lachnoclostridium and interacting with biological aging could modulate the liability for MDD.
2023
interaction; biomarkers; metabolites; inflammation; aging
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/385887
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