We numerically study the fluid dynamics of oil tamponade in models of vitrectomized eyes prompted by a subset of daily activities corresponding to movements on the horizontal plane with the patient in a standing position. Bulk flow features are related to near-wall flow topology and transport at the retinal surface through a wall shear-stress-based analysis. Proliferative VitreoRetinopathy (PVR) is the leading cause of retinal re-detachment occurring in about 20% of all cases due to the accumulation of inflammatory cells in discrete retinal regions. Signalling soluble mediators stimulate inflammatory cells’ chemotaxis and studying their distribution across the retinal surface may acquire clinical relevance. In all the investigated cases, persistent and elongated regions along the retina, potentially prone to accumulate chemo-attractants and cells are observed. Gradients of soluble inflammation mediators present in the aqueous are known responsible for the so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transition that initiates PVR and favours recurrent retinal detachment prompting the proliferation of inflammatory cells with collagen matrix deposition and its contraction. The surgical apposition of encircling scleral buckling elements, known for over a century to influence PVR formation and localization, modifies the attracting regions, possibly causing an accumulation of molecules and cells along approximately vertical lines that follow the rising menisci due to the cerclage indentation. The resulting spatial pattern is compatible with clinical observations. This study may open toward rational analyses of near-wall transport to predict PVR pathogenesis by relating biochemical accumulation in certain areas of the retina to clinical conditions.

Can wall shear-stress topology predict proliferative vitreoretinopathy localization following pars plana vitrectomy?

Ledda, P G;Badas, M G;Querzoli, G
2024-01-01

Abstract

We numerically study the fluid dynamics of oil tamponade in models of vitrectomized eyes prompted by a subset of daily activities corresponding to movements on the horizontal plane with the patient in a standing position. Bulk flow features are related to near-wall flow topology and transport at the retinal surface through a wall shear-stress-based analysis. Proliferative VitreoRetinopathy (PVR) is the leading cause of retinal re-detachment occurring in about 20% of all cases due to the accumulation of inflammatory cells in discrete retinal regions. Signalling soluble mediators stimulate inflammatory cells’ chemotaxis and studying their distribution across the retinal surface may acquire clinical relevance. In all the investigated cases, persistent and elongated regions along the retina, potentially prone to accumulate chemo-attractants and cells are observed. Gradients of soluble inflammation mediators present in the aqueous are known responsible for the so-called epithelial-mesenchymal transition that initiates PVR and favours recurrent retinal detachment prompting the proliferation of inflammatory cells with collagen matrix deposition and its contraction. The surgical apposition of encircling scleral buckling elements, known for over a century to influence PVR formation and localization, modifies the attracting regions, possibly causing an accumulation of molecules and cells along approximately vertical lines that follow the rising menisci due to the cerclage indentation. The resulting spatial pattern is compatible with clinical observations. This study may open toward rational analyses of near-wall transport to predict PVR pathogenesis by relating biochemical accumulation in certain areas of the retina to clinical conditions.
2024
Fluid dynamics; Manifold theory; Proliferative vitreoretinopathy; Retina; Wall shear stresses
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/387444
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