Background: What textbooks usually call the sublingual gland in humans is in reality a tissue mass of two types of salivary glands, the anteriorly located consisting of a cluster of minor sublingual glands and the posteriorly located major sublingual gland with its outlet via Bartholin's duct. Only recently, the adrenergic and cholinergic innervations of the major sublingual gland was reported, while information regarding the neuropeptidergic and nitrergic innervations is still lacking. Methods: Bioptic and autoptic specimens of the human major sublingual gland were examined by means of immunohistochemistry for the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-, neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, substance P (SP)-, calcitonin gene related-peptide (CGRP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-labeled neuronal structures. Results: As to the neuropeptidergic innervation of secretory cells (here in the form of mucous tubular and seromucous cells), the findings showed many VIP-containing nerves, few NPY- and SP-containing nerves and a lack of CGRP-labeled nerves. As to the neuropeptidergic innervation of vessels, the number of VIP-containing nerves was modest, while, of the other neuropeptide-containing nerves under study, only few (SP and CGRP) to very few (NPY) nerves were observed. As to the nitrergic innervation, nNOS-containing nerves were very few close to secretory cells and even absent around vessels. Conclusion: The various innervation patterns may suggest potential transmission mechanisms involved in secretory and vascular responses of the major sublingual gland.

The human major sublingual gland and its neuropeptidergic and nitrergic innervations

Boi M.;Demontis R.;Isola M.;Isola R.;Loy F.;Serra M. P.;Trucas M.;Ekstrom J.;Quartu M.
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: What textbooks usually call the sublingual gland in humans is in reality a tissue mass of two types of salivary glands, the anteriorly located consisting of a cluster of minor sublingual glands and the posteriorly located major sublingual gland with its outlet via Bartholin's duct. Only recently, the adrenergic and cholinergic innervations of the major sublingual gland was reported, while information regarding the neuropeptidergic and nitrergic innervations is still lacking. Methods: Bioptic and autoptic specimens of the human major sublingual gland were examined by means of immunohistochemistry for the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-, neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, substance P (SP)-, calcitonin gene related-peptide (CGRP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-labeled neuronal structures. Results: As to the neuropeptidergic innervation of secretory cells (here in the form of mucous tubular and seromucous cells), the findings showed many VIP-containing nerves, few NPY- and SP-containing nerves and a lack of CGRP-labeled nerves. As to the neuropeptidergic innervation of vessels, the number of VIP-containing nerves was modest, while, of the other neuropeptide-containing nerves under study, only few (SP and CGRP) to very few (NPY) nerves were observed. As to the nitrergic innervation, nNOS-containing nerves were very few close to secretory cells and even absent around vessels. Conclusion: The various innervation patterns may suggest potential transmission mechanisms involved in secretory and vascular responses of the major sublingual gland.
2024
Calcitonin gene related peptide; Human major sublingual gland; Immunohistochemistry; Neuronal nitric oxide synthase; Neuropeptide Y; Substance P; Vasoactive intestinal peptide
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/401363
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