Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system and is characterized by a complex pathogenesis and difficult management. The identification of new biomarkers would be clinically useful for more accurate diagnoses and disease monitoring. Metabolomics, the identification of small endogenous molecules in, offers an instantaneous molecular snapshot of the MS phenotype. Here the metabolomic profiles (utilizing plasma from patients with MS) were characterized with a Gas cromatography-mass spectrometry-based platform followed by a multivariate statistical analysis and comparison with a healthy control (HC) population. The obtained partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model identified and validated significant metabolic differences between individuals with MS and HC (R2X=0.223, R2Y=0.82, Q2=0.562; p<0.001). Among discriminant metabolites phosphate, fructose, myo-inositol, pyroglutamate, threonate, L-leucine, L-asparagine, L-ornithine, L-glutamine, and L-glutamate were correctly identified, and some resulted as unknown. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with AUC 0.84 (p=0.01; CI: 0.75-1) generated with the concentrations of the discriminant metabolites, supported the strength of the model. Pathway analysis indicated asparagine and citrulline biosynthesis as the main canonical pathways involved in MS. Changes in the citrulline biosynthesis pathway suggests the involvement of oxidative stress during neuronal damage. The results confirmed metabolomics as a useful approach to better understand the pathogenesis of MS and to provide new biomarkers for the disease to be used together with clinical data.

Metabolomic analysis identifies altered metabolic pathways in Multiple Sclerosis

PODDIGHE, SIMONE;MURGIA, FEDERICA;LOREFICE, LORENA;LIGGI, SONIA;COCCO, ELEONORA;MARROSU, MARIA GIOVANNA;ATZORI, LUIGI
2017-01-01

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system and is characterized by a complex pathogenesis and difficult management. The identification of new biomarkers would be clinically useful for more accurate diagnoses and disease monitoring. Metabolomics, the identification of small endogenous molecules in, offers an instantaneous molecular snapshot of the MS phenotype. Here the metabolomic profiles (utilizing plasma from patients with MS) were characterized with a Gas cromatography-mass spectrometry-based platform followed by a multivariate statistical analysis and comparison with a healthy control (HC) population. The obtained partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model identified and validated significant metabolic differences between individuals with MS and HC (R2X=0.223, R2Y=0.82, Q2=0.562; p<0.001). Among discriminant metabolites phosphate, fructose, myo-inositol, pyroglutamate, threonate, L-leucine, L-asparagine, L-ornithine, L-glutamine, and L-glutamate were correctly identified, and some resulted as unknown. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with AUC 0.84 (p=0.01; CI: 0.75-1) generated with the concentrations of the discriminant metabolites, supported the strength of the model. Pathway analysis indicated asparagine and citrulline biosynthesis as the main canonical pathways involved in MS. Changes in the citrulline biosynthesis pathway suggests the involvement of oxidative stress during neuronal damage. The results confirmed metabolomics as a useful approach to better understand the pathogenesis of MS and to provide new biomarkers for the disease to be used together with clinical data.
2017
Multiple sclerosis; Metabolomics; Biomarkers; Biomarker discovery; Metabolite profiling; Gas cromatography-mass spectrometry
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/218345
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