Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition characterized by glucose intolerance, with hyperglycemia of varying severity with onset during pregnancy. An uncontrolled GDM can lead to an increased risk of morbidity in the fetus and newborn, and an increased risk of obesity or developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension or neurocognitive developmental impairment in adulthood. In this study, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GS-MS) to analyze the urinary metabolomic profile of newborns of diabetic mothers (NDMs) with the aim of identifying biomarkers useful for the monitoring of NDMs and for early diagnosis of predisposition to develop related chronic diseases. A total of 26 newborns were recruited: 21 children of diabetic mothers, comprising 13 in diet therapy (NDM-diet) and 8 in insulin therapy (NDM-insulin), and 5 control children of non-diabetic mothers (CTR). Urine samples were collected at five time points: at birth (T1), on the third day of life (T2), one week (T3), one month (T4) and six months postpartum (T5). At T1, variations were observed in the levels of seven potential biomarkers (acetate, lactate, glycylproline/proline, isocitrate, N,N-dimethylglycine, N-acetylglucosamine and N-carbamoyl-aspartate) in NMD-insulin infants compared to NDM-diet and CTR infants. In particular, the altered metabolites were found to be involved in several metabolic pathways such as citrate metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism. In contrast, these changes were not visible at subsequent sampling times. The impact of early nutrition (maternal and formula milk) on the metabolomic profile was considered as a potential contributing factor to this finding.

Sardinian Infants of Diabetic Mothers: A Metabolomics Observational Study

Dessi, Angelica;Bosco, Alice;Cesare Marincola, Flaminia;Pintus, Roberta;Paci, Giulia;Fanos, Vassilios;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a condition characterized by glucose intolerance, with hyperglycemia of varying severity with onset during pregnancy. An uncontrolled GDM can lead to an increased risk of morbidity in the fetus and newborn, and an increased risk of obesity or developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension or neurocognitive developmental impairment in adulthood. In this study, we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GS-MS) to analyze the urinary metabolomic profile of newborns of diabetic mothers (NDMs) with the aim of identifying biomarkers useful for the monitoring of NDMs and for early diagnosis of predisposition to develop related chronic diseases. A total of 26 newborns were recruited: 21 children of diabetic mothers, comprising 13 in diet therapy (NDM-diet) and 8 in insulin therapy (NDM-insulin), and 5 control children of non-diabetic mothers (CTR). Urine samples were collected at five time points: at birth (T1), on the third day of life (T2), one week (T3), one month (T4) and six months postpartum (T5). At T1, variations were observed in the levels of seven potential biomarkers (acetate, lactate, glycylproline/proline, isocitrate, N,N-dimethylglycine, N-acetylglucosamine and N-carbamoyl-aspartate) in NMD-insulin infants compared to NDM-diet and CTR infants. In particular, the altered metabolites were found to be involved in several metabolic pathways such as citrate metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, amino sugar and nucleotide sugar metabolism, and pyruvate metabolism. In contrast, these changes were not visible at subsequent sampling times. The impact of early nutrition (maternal and formula milk) on the metabolomic profile was considered as a potential contributing factor to this finding.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/391583
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