SUMMARY. Introduction: Several studies have highlighted differences in academic performance in relation to introversion, neuroticism and psychoticism. Relevant research evidence demonstrates that such personality factors interact with several variables, including age, gender, cultural background and motivation. To this regard, an interesting aspect is afforded by motivational representations within the self-system (e.g., possible selves) and by self-esteem. Overall, research findings often appear partial and contradictory. Consequently, the complex nature of the issue suggests the need to investigate the topic from a multifactorial and integrated perspective. The study examines simultaneously the relationship between personality dimensions, possible selves, self-esteem and academic achievement. Methods: A sample of 360 university students (318 females and 42 males) was examined. The participants were students from psychology courses at the University of Cagliari, in Italy. The following instruments and data were used: the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1990); the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Prezza, Trombaccia & Armento, 1997; Rosenberg, 1965); a self-administered questionnaire purposely prepared to describe possible selves related to psychology as a career; individual scores obtained by students in exams, and the number of exams passed each year. A structural equation modelling analysis was performed on the data. Results: Results support a hierarchical model of links between personality factors, self-related cognitions and academic performance estimated in terms of rating scores and number of exams passed. Specifically, this model posits personality factors at the apex, self-esteem at a subordinated level, and possible selves at a lower level. These factors are related to each other and affect two indices of academic performance in direct and indirect ways. The analysis seems to support the influence of cultural factors. Furthermore, the analyses seem to suggest that cultural factors might have a role in this complex pattern of relations. Conclusions: Overall, the study suggests a complex and hierarchical system of relationships between personality factors, self-esteem, possible selves and academic performance. The findings partially clarify several contradictory aspects of the topic and encourage further investigation.

Personality, self-related cognitions, and academic achievement among psychology university students in an Italian background

MELEDDU, MAURO;SCALAS, LAURA FRANCESCA
2009

Abstract

SUMMARY. Introduction: Several studies have highlighted differences in academic performance in relation to introversion, neuroticism and psychoticism. Relevant research evidence demonstrates that such personality factors interact with several variables, including age, gender, cultural background and motivation. To this regard, an interesting aspect is afforded by motivational representations within the self-system (e.g., possible selves) and by self-esteem. Overall, research findings often appear partial and contradictory. Consequently, the complex nature of the issue suggests the need to investigate the topic from a multifactorial and integrated perspective. The study examines simultaneously the relationship between personality dimensions, possible selves, self-esteem and academic achievement. Methods: A sample of 360 university students (318 females and 42 males) was examined. The participants were students from psychology courses at the University of Cagliari, in Italy. The following instruments and data were used: the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1990); the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Prezza, Trombaccia & Armento, 1997; Rosenberg, 1965); a self-administered questionnaire purposely prepared to describe possible selves related to psychology as a career; individual scores obtained by students in exams, and the number of exams passed each year. A structural equation modelling analysis was performed on the data. Results: Results support a hierarchical model of links between personality factors, self-related cognitions and academic performance estimated in terms of rating scores and number of exams passed. Specifically, this model posits personality factors at the apex, self-esteem at a subordinated level, and possible selves at a lower level. These factors are related to each other and affect two indices of academic performance in direct and indirect ways. The analysis seems to support the influence of cultural factors. Furthermore, the analyses seem to suggest that cultural factors might have a role in this complex pattern of relations. Conclusions: Overall, the study suggests a complex and hierarchical system of relationships between personality factors, self-esteem, possible selves and academic performance. The findings partially clarify several contradictory aspects of the topic and encourage further investigation.
Academic Achievement,; Personality; Self-System
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/20496
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