Individual differences in sweet taste sensitivity can affect dietary preferences as well as nutritional status. Despite the lack of consensus, it is believed that sweet taste is impacted by genetic and environmental variables. Here we determined the effect of well-established factors influencing the general taste variability, such as gender and fungiform papillae density, specific genetic variants (SNPs of TAS1R2 and TAS1R3 receptors genes), and non-specific genetic factors (PROP phenotype and genotype), on the threshold and suprathreshold sweet taste sensitivity. Suprathreshold measurements showed that the sweet taste response increased in a dose-dependent manner, and this was related to PROP phenotype, gender, rs35874116 SNP in the TAS1R2 gene, and rs307355 SNP in the TAS1R3 gene. The threshold values and density of fungiform papillae exhibited a strong correlation, and both varied according to PROP phenotype. Our data confirm the role of PROP taste status in the sweet perception related to fungiform papilla density, show a higher sweet sensitivity in females who had lower BMI than males, and demonstrate for the first time the involvement of the rs35874116 SNP of TAS1R2 in the sweet taste sensitivity of normal weight subjects with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 20.2 to 24.8 kg/m2. These results may have an important impact on nutrition and health mostly in subjects with low taste ability for sweets and thus with high vulnerability to developing obesity or metabolic disease.

Associations between Sweet Taste Sensitivity and Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TAS1R2 and TAS1R3 Genes, Gender, PROP Taster Status, and Density of Fungiform Papillae in a Genetically Homogeneous Sardinian Cohort

Melania Melis
Primo
Project Administration
;
Mariano Mastinu
Secondo
Methodology
;
Lala Chaimae Naciri
Methodology
;
Patrizia Muroni
Methodology
;
Iole Tomassini Barbarossa
Ultimo
Project Administration
2022-01-01

Abstract

Individual differences in sweet taste sensitivity can affect dietary preferences as well as nutritional status. Despite the lack of consensus, it is believed that sweet taste is impacted by genetic and environmental variables. Here we determined the effect of well-established factors influencing the general taste variability, such as gender and fungiform papillae density, specific genetic variants (SNPs of TAS1R2 and TAS1R3 receptors genes), and non-specific genetic factors (PROP phenotype and genotype), on the threshold and suprathreshold sweet taste sensitivity. Suprathreshold measurements showed that the sweet taste response increased in a dose-dependent manner, and this was related to PROP phenotype, gender, rs35874116 SNP in the TAS1R2 gene, and rs307355 SNP in the TAS1R3 gene. The threshold values and density of fungiform papillae exhibited a strong correlation, and both varied according to PROP phenotype. Our data confirm the role of PROP taste status in the sweet perception related to fungiform papilla density, show a higher sweet sensitivity in females who had lower BMI than males, and demonstrate for the first time the involvement of the rs35874116 SNP of TAS1R2 in the sweet taste sensitivity of normal weight subjects with body mass index (BMI) ranging from 20.2 to 24.8 kg/m2. These results may have an important impact on nutrition and health mostly in subjects with low taste ability for sweets and thus with high vulnerability to developing obesity or metabolic disease.
gender; PROP phenotype and genotype; sweet taste sensitivity; TAS1R2 and TAS1R3 genes
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11584/348976
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